Category Archives: DevOps

Continuous deployment to the WordPress directory with CircleCI

Note: This article focuses on how to continuously deploy a plugin using CircleCI. But you can also use everything discussed here with a theme as well.

As developers, we all have our preferred tools and distinct way of working. That’s why it’s not uncommon for us to write about it or create scripts to set up our work computers. But the one tool that most of us tend to agree on is using git for version control.

That said, if you’ve ever had a plugin or theme on the WordPress directory, you know that it doesn’t use git. It uses subversion. That’s a problem for a lot of us because we don’t want to have to deal with both.

While there are a lot of resources out there to deal with this problem, it also presents us with an opportunity. We can use this problem to build a continuous deployment workflow for the WordPress directory. This will allow us to not worry about this aspect of WordPress plugin development anymore.

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Getting started with continuous integration and WordPress

I gave an introduction to continuous integration with WordPress at WordCamp San Diego 2018. This is the companion article that I wrote for it. If you’re just looking for the slides, click here.

Writing high-quality WordPress code is hard to do. It requires constant effort on our part and good self-awareness to know when we slipped up. But, if your business has any sort of success (which we all want!), you’re going to work with more and more people. And many of them are likely to touch with your code.

This is going to put a strain on your development processes. It becomes harder to maintain a certain level of code quality. And you’re no longer the only person making code changes. You’re now part of a team, and you need a way to standardize all of the things you once did on your own.

That’s goal of continuous integration. It lets you automate your different development workflows. This ensures that the quality of your code stays consistent.

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Introduction to automated WordPress deployments

I gave an introduction to automated WordPress deployments at WordCamp Miami 2017. This is the companion article that I wrote for it. If you’re just looking for the slides, click here.

How do you feel when you have to update the code on a client’s WordPress site? Do you feel confident that everything will be ok? Or are you filled with dread as if you were about to play a round of Russian roulette?

For a lot of us, it’s a lot closer to the Russian roulette! We press the upload button of our favourite FTP client. We then spend the next minute refreshing the home page in our browser hoping not to see a white screen of death. (Followed by a sigh of relief when everything loads as it should!)

This is a pretty stressful way to work. You shouldn’t have to feel this way each time that you want to update the code of a WordPress site. It should be something that you can do as often as you want without worrying that you broke your site in the process.

And that’s where the idea of automated WordPress deployment comes in. As the name implies, it’s all about automating this process of updating a WordPress site. This, in turn, makes this risky process safer. (But keep in mind that this isn’t a bulletproof solution!)

Gone are the days where you’re playing Russian roulette each time that you want to make a change! You can now update your client’s WordPress site with a lot more confidence. This lets you focus on shipping bug fixes (yay bugs!) and new features.

That said, there are a lot of different ways of automating your WordPress deployments. We’ll go over what makes a successful automated WordPress deployment workflow. We’ll also look at a lot of different tools that you can use to achieve it.

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